Knowledge Translation component of AgriSafety Program Projects

Knowledge translation and dissemination of findings for AgriSafety Program projects will be conducted in conjunction with the Canadian Centre for Health and Safety in Agriculture (CCHSA; Saskatoon, SK) as lead organization of the Knowledge Translation component of the AgriSafety Program, with assistance and input from the Canadian Agricultural Safety Association(CASA; Winnipeg, MB).

The Objectives of the Knowledge Translation component are: to work in partnership with the AgriSafety Program project teams in order to develop knowledge translation materials and approaches throughout the course of the projects in order to fulfill the mandates of the AgriSafety Program; and to facilitate the AgriSafety Program through an annual meeting of all project team members.

In collaboration with the research teams, CCHSA will develop KT materials and programming to ensure that practical usable products, processes and knowledge are made available to end users in the most effective manner possible. Thus the approach will be to work with researchers involved in the activities with the objective of developing appropriate programming that interfaces with the six elements of the Hierarchy of Controls (hazard description, risk assessment, hazard elimination, engineering controls, administrative controls, personal protective equipment) (ILO Code of Practice, 2011).In each case, KT material and programming will be developed in cooperation with the research activity in such a manner to make the product potentially usable across Canada, or to make safety knowledge gained from the research available across Canada. It is the intention that the preliminary program or KT material developed will undergo pilot testing and evaluation through the Saskatchewan Agricultural Health and Safety Network among some 30,000 farm families in the province. It is then intended that working with the Canadian Agricultural Safety Association (CASA), the programming and materials will be made available to all interested jurisdictions in Canada. A primary method of dissemination and communication will be through a national KT news alert publication titled CANFARMSAFE. All documentation will be produced in the two official language of Canada, French and English.

CCHSA will coordinate an annual meeting of the scientific teams for each project. The meetings will provide an opportunity for researchers to present updates on progress, plans for the coming year, and allow collaborative exchange of ideas and knowledge to help guide the project teams through each developmental year. Proceedings of the meeting will be collated and distributed to the participants.


Background Information

The Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) defines knowledge translation (KT) as "... a dynamic and iterative process that includes synthesis, dissemination, exchange and ethically-sound application of knowledge to improve the health of Canadians, provide more effective health services and products and strengthen the health care system." In the context of agricultural health and safety this includes the synthesis, dissemination, and exchange of new knowledge and applied outcomes to improve the health and safety of Canadian farmers, and to help protect them from injury, illness, and disability.

The Canadian Centre for Health and Safety in Agriculture (CCHSA) has a 28 year history of performing KT activities throughout Saskatchewan (and, in the past, across Canada) through its Agricultural Health and Safety Network. The Network produces and delivers occupational health and safety programs and materials to almost 30,000 farm families across Saskatchewan, representing more than half of all Saskatchewan farm families and approximately 70% of all Saskatchewan Rural Municipalities.

Aims

Getting information from applied research and development projects into the hands of farmers is crucial for effective integration of research to practice. Equally challenging is doing so on a national scale, either through knowledge transmission or actual delivery of end products and innovations to farmers. It is vital to have a plan for dissemination and transmission of research innovation and knowledge so as to encourage as much wide spread adoption of new products, innovations and ideas as possible. To do this, integrated KT will be the preferred approach. The integration of knowledge users into the research process allows for: (1) defining a research question that is relevant; (2) utilizing research findings into an appropriate message; and (3) to applying research results into practice. Knowledge users can be, but not limited to, agricultural producers, decision and policy makers, safety specialists, health professionals and media. The Knowledge Translation/Research Cycle involves all stakeholders and activities in the knowledge to action process. CCHSA will use its expertise in agricultural health and safety KT to develop and disseminate KT materials, information and resources to stakeholder s across Canada. In addition to developi ng and delivering these materials and outputs, CCHSA will co-ordinate an annual meeting of the research teams.

  1. Develop a national dissemination network database for the distribution of project information and outcomes.
  2. Develop and disseminate knowledge translation materials focused on the priority areas on which the projects are based.
  3. Host an annual collaborative meeting for project teams.



For further information about the KT component of the AgriSafety Program, please contact Program Manager Nadia Smith at 306-966-1648 or by email at nadia.smith@usask.ca.

References

ILO Code of Practice: Safety and Health in Agriculture, International Labour Organization,2011. CIHR - www. cihr.ca: Knowledge Translation and Commercialization information page http://www.cihr­ irsc.gc.ca/e/39033.html

Year 3 (2016-17) Update

Year 3 was the first year of the pilot project for Disvoery Days as part of KT programming for the AgriSafety Program. The demonstration includes presetnations targeted to school aged children - the ROPS demo and the Glo Germ demo. Both demonstrations highlight the applied research being done by the AgriSafety Program projects. Between spring 2016 and winter 2017 the demonstrations were presetned to 28 rural Saskatchewan schools and community events, tallying 1,994 students in the following school divisions: Living Sky, Sun West, Horizon, Chinook, Prairie Valley, North East, Prairie South, Prairie Spirit and South East Cornerstone. The two demonstrations will continue to be part of Discovery Days in Year 4 of the AgriSafety Program

Four informational bulletins along with one four-page newsletter update on the current state of the AgriSafety Program and its research projects were produced in Year 3. The newsletter was distributed through the Agricultural Health and Safety Network Newsletter which is mailed out to 28,000 farm families in Saskatchewan. Informational bulletins from both Year 2 and 3 were distributed through the CASA Communiqué newsletter as well as on social media. A ROPS recruitment advertisement was run on the back page of the Network News in fall 2016 to encourage farmers to participate in the farm built ROPS project. 

Three ROPS workshops also took place in the fall of 2016, two of the workshops were during the Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities (SARM) midterm meeting and the third was at the Agricultural Producers  Association of Saskatchewan (APAS) midterm meetings. THe meetings were organized by the Agricultural Health and Safety Network. The presenter for the workshops was the ROPS team lead Jim Wassermann. 

Progress was made on the production of short videos for each project in Year 3. Timelines, storyboards and scripts were put together for each project and filming began on the ROPS project video at the end of Year 3. The remaining film and editing processes will take place in Year 4. 

The Annual Collaborative Meeting for the AgriSafety Program  research teams was held early in the summer of 2016 and brought together members from each project in Saskatoon. At the meeting researchers had the opportunity to provide project updates to the group and discuss the upcoming year of the project. The annual meeting preceded the National Summit on the Control of Agricultural Injuries and Death in Canada, which was held in Saskatoon on June 7, 2016. The Summit brough together stakeholders from across Canada and three states to discuss the current state of applied research in agricultural health and safety. The Summit was a great success and provided researchers and stakeholders with an opportunity to connect and network.

Moving into Year 4, the final year of the AgriSafety Program the KT team will continue to produce bulletins for distribution in addition to a few longer summary type pieces to capture the entire research projects for each topic. We will also be wrapping up video production for each of the project videos to help promote awareness of both the projects and program. 

In Year 3, the following bulletins were produced, and are available for download on the "KT Output" Tab on this page:

17-01-014 Wanted: Farmers to Build ROPS

17-01-015 Rollover Protective Structure (ROPS) Educational Demonstration for Kids

17-01-016 Glo Germ Demonstration for Youth

17-01-017 Airborne Contaminant Reduction Stragegies for Improving Health of Pig Producers


Year 2 (2015-16) Update

Year two was a successful year at meeting project goals and developing innovative dissemination strategies. The KT project met its goals of four bulletins, which consisted of extensive background information and updates of the activities’ progress. A national distribution plan for completed bulletins was organized with CASA.  Bulletins from year one were electronically distributed through CASA Communiqué newsletter over an eight-week time period.  Communiqué newsletter is electronically distributed weekly to 150 subscribers.  Further distribution efforts were made in a two-page article in the Network Newsletter reaching 28,000 Saskatchewan farm families.

In October, the KT team successfully hosted an annual meeting with 20 activity partners in Saskatoon.  Researchers updated the group on the progress of their activity.  Updates were presented by the following team members: program management: Nadia Smith, Activity 2: Jim Wassermann, Activity 2 (SafetyNet): Ewa Dabrowska-Miciula , Activity 3A: Matthieu Gerard, Activity 3B: Bernardo Predicala,Activity 2 & 3 KT: Niels Koehncke. Moreover, the KT team took the meeting as an opportunity to gather thoughts and suggestions on innovative KT distribution strategies for each Activity project.  The teams came to a consensus on making informational videos for each activity to showcase the research projects. Plans for developing videos are currently underway. 

Youth Educational Demonstrations

The KT team is excited to announce two innovative projects that are being developed to educate youth about the importance of sanitary practices (e.g. washing hands) when handling farm animals (e.g. pigs) and Rollover Protective Structures on tractors.  The projects will be presented at rural schools and communities as a part of the Agricultural Health and Safety Network Discovery Days in year three. 

The Glo germ demonstration will educate kids on the importance of washing hands after handling farm animals such as pigs.  A baseball covered in glowing powdered substance will be passed around a group of kids.  Once the ball has been passed around, the instructor will shine a UV lamp over their hands to show how germs and bacteria can spread.  Next, the kids are instructed to wash their hands with warm soapy water.  Once again, the instructor will shine the UV lamp over the kids’ hands, this time exposing the remnants of powder. The purpose of this demonstration is to explain how easy germs and bacteria can spread without proper hand washing routine.  Although the demonstration is rather simple, it is a fundamental lesson of the importance of biosecurity procedures.  

The ROPS demonstration will teach youth that the combination of roll over protective structures and seatbelts can save the lives of workers. Demonstration will consist of two toy tractors (one without and one with ROPS), tractor over-turn base, and eggs. The audience will witness the demonstration of each tractor, losing center of gravity on the tractor over-turn base.  Results will show the egg breaking on the tractor without ROPS and protection of egg on the tractor with ROPS and seatbelt. 


In Year 2, the following bulletins were produced, and are available for download on the "KT Output" Tab on this page:

15-12-009 Agrivita Canada Inc. and the Canadian AgriSafety Applied Research Program

16-02-010 Importance of Controlling Airborne Pathogens in Transport Trailers

16-02-011 Common Airborne Transmissible Diseases in Canadian Swine Herds

16-03-012 Techniques to Control Odorous Compounds, Gas and Bioaerosols in Swine Buildings


Year 1 (2014-15) Update

One of the biggest challenges for research activities is the dissemination to the right groups as the capstone of the success of a project. With the contacts and audience of the Agricultural Health and Safety Network at the disposal of the KT team, this project is in a perfect setting to make this happen.

The goal is to get the new knowledge from the above projects to improve the health and safety of Canadian Farmers, and to help protect them from injury, illness, and disability.

Getting information from applied research and development projects into the hands of farmers is crucial for effective integration of research to practice. Equally challenging is doing so on a national scale, either through knowledge transmission or actual delivery of end products and innovations to farmers. It is vital to have a plan for dissemination and transmission of research innovation and knowledge so as to encourage as much wide spread adoption of new products, innovations and ideas as possible.

CCHSA is using its expertise in agricultural health and safety KT to develop and disseminate KT materials, information and resources to stakeholders across Canada regarding two funded activities under the Canadian AgriSafety Applied Research Program: Activity 2 titled “Machinery Injury: Low Cost ROPS Intervention Pilot Project” and Activity 3 titled “Animal Housing Environments”.

Year one was a successful learning year where the team was familiarized with the content of the two activities through the meetings and the literature reviews. There was a successful meeting at the October, 2014 International Symposium and subsequent less formal meetings held to get all parties on the same KT page.


We have successfully developed eight bulletins ready for distribution. They are available for download on the "KT Output" Tab on this page.

15-03-001: Air quality in Canadian hog buildings: reduction of airborne dust, gas and human pathogens in buildings and their environmental dispersion. Background Information.

15-03-002: Air quality in Canadian hog buildings: reduction of airborne dust, gas and human pathogens in buildings and their environmental dispersion.

15-03-003: Preventing airborne transmission of diseases in swine: development of an air filtration system for animal transport vehicles.

15-03-004: Focus on Rollover Protective Structures (ROPS)

15-03-005: ROPS Effectiveness – Barriers & Motivators

15-03-006: The Economics of Rollover Protective Structures

15-03-007: Rollover Protection Structures (ROPS): Filling the Commercial Gap

15-03-008: Hazard Control and Rollover Protective Structures (ROPS) on Your Farm

Next Steps:

Year one provided a background of information on the two Activities that will lead us into an even more successful year two. With eight bulletins under our belt and a clear path as to the future development of material to be distributed in a variety of mediums, we have created the momentum to continue this KT project.

We kickstart year two with information in the Network Newsletter reaching 30,000 Saskatchewan farm families, an article in the Rural Councilor, and the distribution of our bulletins electronically. The Agricultural Health and Safety Network website will host key information for farmers as well as link to the Agrivita website for further information. There will be further distribution of what we produce to our list of email contacts.

Through a series of safety messages and links on Facebook and Twitter we will use Social Media as an additional means of distributing information.

An annual scientific meeting of the Canadian AgriSafety Applied Research Program scientific teams will be organized by CCCHSA. The purpose of these meeting will be to provide updates on research progress, highlight key developments and milestones, and outline planning for the coming year and remainder of the research program. Proceedings of the meeting will be distributed to participants.

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